COVID Response: All in-person and/or online programming will adapt with the most current health guidelines.
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Wed, Feb 10 | https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZ

Climate Change: Scientific vs. Ideological Disagreements. Professor Daniel Bonevac

No virtue-signaling: this lecture will be an occasion to engage with the science and to address the inevitable disagreements that exist among reasonable people of goodwill.
Registration is Closed
Climate Change: Scientific vs. Ideological Disagreements. Professor Daniel Bonevac

Time & Location

Feb 10, 7:00 PM – 8:30 PM
https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZ

About The Event

Program description:

Views about global warming and citizens' reactions to climate change are certainly among the most polarized and polarizing issues of our contemporary society. In this lecture, Dr. Daniel Bonvevac will help us explore this particular divide, uncovering the real questions, debates, policy options, and tradeoffs regarding climate change. No virtue-signaling: this lecture will be an occasion to engage with the science and to address the inevitable disagreements that exist among reasonable people of goodwill.

Our COVID response for our lectures

Our in-person attendance is limited in accordance with the City of Austin’s most current Covid guidelines. This lecture is online only. 

About our scholar

Professor Daniel Bonevac, UT Austin

Professor Bonevac works mainly in metaphysics, philosophy of mathematics, semantics, and philosophical logic. His book Reduction in the Abstract Sciences received the Johnsonian Prize from The Journal of Philosophy. The author of five books and editor or co-editor of four others, Professor Bonevac's articles include “Against Conditional Obligation” (Noûs), "Sellars v. the Given" (Philosophy and Phenomenological Research), "Reflection Without Equilibrium," (Journal of Philosophy), "Free Choice Permission Is Strong Permission" (Synthese, with Nicholas Asher), "The Conditional Fallacy," (Philosophical Review, with Josh Dever and David Sosa), “The Counterexample Fallacy” (Mind, also with Dever and Sosa), and “The Argument from Miracles” and “Two Theories of Analogical Predication” (Oxford Studies in the Philosophy of Religion). He was Chairman of the Department of Philosophy from 1991 to 2001.

About this semester's themes:

The Great Divides

Polarization is a buzz word and all one has to do is spend a few minutes on the internet or watching TV to figure out why. On issue after issue, we are divided. From constitutional law to climate change to the relationship between religion and science, the spring 2021 semester's programming at the Austin Institute is designed to convey a sense of the landscape, to map out many of the biggest disagreements separating Americans.

Registration is Closed

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